Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Life-Sized Candy Land

Over at the ALSC Blog, I've posted our recipe for Life-Sized Candy Land! This was a really fun program we offered over spring break, so head on over there and check it out.

7 comments:

Sarah said...

Awesome! I did a Life Size Monopoly for my teens back in January. They had so much fun.

pdowns said...

Thanks, Abby! I will share this with my team and give you full credit--you are just awesome and so is your blog!

Erlene said...

Years ago, when it was new, I did a Trivial Pusuit Game at my elementary school. I made a big round board and a huge dice and then tons of kid friendly questions and catagories, all color coded. The kids loved it and they were the markers and collected colored dots as they got questions correct!! Laminating everythings helped me be able to roll it up and store it. I could always change the questions. I had to remake the die over the years!! They loved throwing the dice!!!

Abby said...

Erlene, that is a *great* idea! My brain wheels are turning, thinking about when/how we could offer that at my library... Thanks!

missprint said...

I just looked at pictures of this on the ALSC post and it looks like the coolest thing ever!

Not actually related to the post at hand, but this is also an official invitation to join my "Finding the 'good' parents in YA Lit" challenge and post your own list of books with "good" parents.

You can find all the information here:
http://wp.me/p6kfM-LB

Thanks!

Carol said...

Can't wait to try this at my library! However, it's been a LONG time since I played this with my daughters. Did you call out a color for each person and have them advance one at time, or use dice?

Abby said...

Carol, we called out one color for everybody and they all advanced at the same time. I had a mic and a stack of cards (though I could mix it up and call certain colors if I saw that things needed to move along more quickly, etc.). We lined the kids up outside the room and let them start the game board one at a time. So I'd call out red and each kid would move to the next red and the next kid in line to start would start on a red square. Then I'd call out, say, purple, and everyone would move to the next purple square and the next kid to start the game board would start on purple. It mostly kept them from bunching up too badly and it was the only thing we could figure with that number of kids (we had over 80 kids come through).